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Description: Write and illustrate anti-bully TV or radio announcements to send out your messages to your school. Write a paragraph about the best announcement.

Teaches: Character education (standing up for a cause); persuasive writing about bullying; public speaking skills in delivering anti-bullying messages; and creating posters to reinforce messages.

Helpful Hints: Talk about how public service announcements on TV and radio make people think about doing positive things, such as achieving in school, wearing seat belts, not drinking and driving, not taking drugs, or staying close as a family.
Discuss how using strong verbs (action words) and visuals (in this case, posters) help make these announcements move people to act in a positive way.

Examples of Strong Verbs
stamp out teasing
combat cruel treatment
fight name calling
crush cyber bullying

Talk about why people often pay attention to short messages more than they do to long ones.

Sample Answer

People in today’s world often prefer short messages because they live faster-paced lives than people did in past generations. People like their messages brief and packed with information. Shorter messages hold their attention and keep them from getting bored.

Discuss the elements of a powerful sentence that will move people to action: a public service announcement contains one main idea that makes good sense; the writers also express their ideas clearly and creatively. Before small groups present their announcements to the class, remind them of the difference between presenting radio and TV spot announcements. For radio delivery, they will stress expression and speaking clearly. For a TV message, they will emphasize the same things but will add facial expressions and appropriate body language to reinforce their messages.

Entire Class
1.  Ask the class to think of public service announcements, brief one or two sentence announcements they’ve heard on TV or radio.
Examples
“A mind is a horrible thing to waste”
“The children are our future”
“Just say no to drugs”
“Seat belts save lives”

2.      Ask why people might pay close attention to such an announcement
Suggested Answers
The announcement is short.
The message is important.
The person saying it seems believable.

3.  Have the class generate anti-bullying statements that they will deliver to a TV or radio audience. Write the statements on the board. Have the class vote on the ten best spot announcements and justify their choices.

Small Groups
1.        Ask groups or partners to create their own brief announcements (or to choose one that the class composed) about why bullying is wrong:
“Tempted to pick on someone different from you? Celebrate the difference instead.”
“Feel the urge to bully? Think twice and walk away.”
“You never know where cyber bullying leads. Spread friendship, not hate, on the web.”
“Be bigger than the crowd. Don’t join in.”
“Bystanders save the day.”

2.  Students will create posters to illustrate their spots. They will deliver their   announcements to the class as if they are on TV or radio and will display their   posters.
3.   You may want to videotape or record the announcements to share with another class. Later, display posters in the halls. Groups will approach the local newspaper or weekly ad paper with their projects and ask if the media would like to print selected announcements.
4.    Ask the principal to feature students delivering selected announcements on the public-address system (PA) with the homeroom or morning messages or in an assembly.

Individuals
Students will choose one of the spots that another group presented to the class. They will write a paragraph about why they think the spot announcement they chose will make people think before they hurt someone with words or actions. Students discuss their opinions with the class.

Write an Anti-bullying Public Service Announcement (Activity 3)


Description: Write and illustrate anti-bully TV or radio announcements to send out your messages to your school. Write a paragraph about the best announcement.

Teaches: Character education (standing up for a cause); persuasive writing about bullying; public speaking skills in delivering anti-bullying messages; and creating posters to reinforce messages.

Helpful Hints: Talk about how public service announcements on TV and radio make people think about doing positive things, such as achieving in school, wearing seat belts, not drinking and driving, not taking drugs, or staying close as a family.
Discuss how using strong verbs (action words) and visuals (in this case, posters) help make these announcements move people to act in a positive way.

Examples of Strong Verbs
stamp out teasing
combat cruel treatment
fight name calling
crush cyber bullying

Talk about why people often pay attention to short messages more than they do to long ones.

Sample Answer

People in today’s world often prefer short messages because they live faster-paced lives than people did in past generations. People like their messages brief and packed with information. Shorter messages hold their attention and keep them from getting bored.

Discuss the elements of a powerful sentence that will move people to action: a public service announcement contains one main idea that makes good sense; the writers also express their ideas clearly and creatively. Before small groups present their announcements to the class, remind them of the difference between presenting radio and TV spot announcements. For radio delivery, they will stress expression and speaking clearly. For a TV message, they will emphasize the same things but will add facial expressions and appropriate body language to reinforce their messages.

Entire Class
1.  Ask the class to think of public service announcements, brief one or two sentence announcements they’ve heard on TV or radio.
Examples
“A mind is a horrible thing to waste”
“The children are our future”
“Just say no to drugs”
“Seat belts save lives”

2.      Ask why people might pay close attention to such an announcement
Suggested Answers
The announcement is short.
The message is important.
The person saying it seems believable.

3.  Have the class generate anti-bullying statements that they will deliver to a TV or radio audience. Write the statements on the board. Have the class vote on the ten best spot announcements and justify their choices.

Small Groups
1.        Ask groups or partners to create their own brief announcements (or to choose one that the class composed) about why bullying is wrong:
“Tempted to pick on someone different from you? Celebrate the difference instead.”
“Feel the urge to bully? Think twice and walk away.”
“You never know where cyber bullying leads. Spread friendship, not hate, on the web.”
“Be bigger than the crowd. Don’t join in.”
“Bystanders save the day.”

2.  Students will create posters to illustrate their spots. They will deliver their   announcements to the class as if they are on TV or radio and will display their   posters.
3.   You may want to videotape or record the announcements to share with another class. Later, display posters in the halls. Groups will approach the local newspaper or weekly ad paper with their projects and ask if the media would like to print selected announcements.
4.    Ask the principal to feature students delivering selected announcements on the public-address system (PA) with the homeroom or morning messages or in an assembly.

Individuals
Students will choose one of the spots that another group presented to the class. They will write a paragraph about why they think the spot announcement they chose will make people think before they hurt someone with words or actions. Students discuss their opinions with the class.
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