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Readers to help less able readers develop better reading skills. In North America it is also known as 'Duolog' Reading. The method is adaptable to any reading material, and tutees select books which are of intrinsic interest to them. Encouragement to read 'little and often' is usual. The technique has two main aspects. Initially, tutor and tutee read out loud simultaneously in close synchrony. This is termed 'Reading Together'. The tutor adjusts their reading to the tutee's pace as necessary. The tutee must read all the words out loud correctly. Errors are corrected merely by the tutor again giving a perfect example of how to read the error word, and ensuring that the tutee repeats it correctly - then the pair continue.


The second aspect is termed 'Reading Alone' or independent reading. When the tutee feels confident enough to read a section of text unsupported, the tutee signals by a knock, nudge or other non-verbal signal for the tutor to be silent. The tutor praises the tutee for taking this initiative, and subsequently praises the tutee very regularly, especially for mastering very difficult words or spontaneously self-correcting. When the tutee makes an error when Reading Alone, the tutor corrects this as before, by modelling and ensuring perfect repetition, and then joins back in reading simultaneously. Any word not read correctly within 4 seconds is treated as an errorthe tutee is not left to struggle. Initially, much reading is usually done simultaneously, but as the tutee improves and makes more appropriate choices of reading materials, more and more independent reading occurs. Any tendency to rush on the part of the tutee is usually resolved by consistent use of the correction procedure and visually 'pacing' the reading by pointing to each word as it is to be pronounced. A sample 'How To Do It' leaflet for potential tutors is reproduced on p.8. This was written for parents helping their children at home. Different versions are used in peer tutoring and adult literacy. Read this leaflet now before continuing with this chapter. You may reproduce this leaflet for your own use. It is deliberately quite long and full of detail, although the readability level has been kept low. You might want to abbreviate it for your own use, or produce a simpler list of 'rules' to go with it. For use with families or peer tutoring situations where the participants are bilingual, you might wish to have the leaflet translated into languages other than English. We have not included any examples of such translations in this book because the list of possible languages would be very long. You might feel as if such translation would be of little use in situations where many of the bilingual population were not literate in their mother tongue. However, Paired Reading is very flexible and can be used in many ways to develop family literacy. Sometimes children will (for example) take home 'How To Do It' leaflets in two languages and/or dual-language books. This can result in an uncle using Paired

What is Paired Reading? (KEITH TOPPING)


Readers to help less able readers develop better reading skills. In North America it is also known as 'Duolog' Reading. The method is adaptable to any reading material, and tutees select books which are of intrinsic interest to them. Encouragement to read 'little and often' is usual. The technique has two main aspects. Initially, tutor and tutee read out loud simultaneously in close synchrony. This is termed 'Reading Together'. The tutor adjusts their reading to the tutee's pace as necessary. The tutee must read all the words out loud correctly. Errors are corrected merely by the tutor again giving a perfect example of how to read the error word, and ensuring that the tutee repeats it correctly - then the pair continue.


The second aspect is termed 'Reading Alone' or independent reading. When the tutee feels confident enough to read a section of text unsupported, the tutee signals by a knock, nudge or other non-verbal signal for the tutor to be silent. The tutor praises the tutee for taking this initiative, and subsequently praises the tutee very regularly, especially for mastering very difficult words or spontaneously self-correcting. When the tutee makes an error when Reading Alone, the tutor corrects this as before, by modelling and ensuring perfect repetition, and then joins back in reading simultaneously. Any word not read correctly within 4 seconds is treated as an errorthe tutee is not left to struggle. Initially, much reading is usually done simultaneously, but as the tutee improves and makes more appropriate choices of reading materials, more and more independent reading occurs. Any tendency to rush on the part of the tutee is usually resolved by consistent use of the correction procedure and visually 'pacing' the reading by pointing to each word as it is to be pronounced. A sample 'How To Do It' leaflet for potential tutors is reproduced on p.8. This was written for parents helping their children at home. Different versions are used in peer tutoring and adult literacy. Read this leaflet now before continuing with this chapter. You may reproduce this leaflet for your own use. It is deliberately quite long and full of detail, although the readability level has been kept low. You might want to abbreviate it for your own use, or produce a simpler list of 'rules' to go with it. For use with families or peer tutoring situations where the participants are bilingual, you might wish to have the leaflet translated into languages other than English. We have not included any examples of such translations in this book because the list of possible languages would be very long. You might feel as if such translation would be of little use in situations where many of the bilingual population were not literate in their mother tongue. However, Paired Reading is very flexible and can be used in many ways to develop family literacy. Sometimes children will (for example) take home 'How To Do It' leaflets in two languages and/or dual-language books. This can result in an uncle using Paired

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